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Are you in the throes of a 'Facebook divorce'?

There are countless ways that information can surface via social media and compromise a marriage. In fact, an increasing number of marriages have come to an end as a direct result of Facebook.

Divorces that come about as a result of social media are now being referred to as ""Facebook divorces."" Furthermore, lawyers are learning how to use evidence gathered from Facebook to prove and/or defend their clients.

Evidence that lawyers could try to use in a Facebook divorce

Here are different kinds of evidence that family law attorneys have been known to use against people amid ""Facebook divorces"":

  • Someone tags you in a compromising photograph. Perhaps the photograph shows you at a party or on an overseas vacation with a lover, when you have been saying in court that you don't have enough time to visit with your kids. Or, perhaps a lawyer uses a compromising Facebook tag to prove that you've been unfaithful.
  • Facebook posts showing off expensive purchases even though you have been saying you're having money problems and you're unemployed.
  • Posts that reveal where you are in spite of where you said you were going during child visitations and/or business trips.
  • Any Facebook posts that suggest you have been deceiving others.

Perhaps it's best to stay off Facebook during your divorce

The safe recommendation is to avoid Facebook entirely. Spouses who don't use Facebook -- or just shut their accounts down -- during their divorce proceedings, run less risk of getting into trouble regarding any Facebook activity.

However, if you're like most people and you can't resist going online to check the ""Facebook news"" on a regular basis, here are a couple of pieces of advice to keep in mind:

  • Scrutinize everything you're posting from the perspective of your divorce proceedings.
  • Remember that what you say, and what you post, can be used against you.
  • Know that your soon-to-be ex's divorce lawyer will be scouring your Facebook wall for evidence to be used against you.
  • Facebook can do whatever it wants with your content.
  • Friends and family could still post Facebook content that gets you into trouble -- even if you don't use Facebook yourself.
  • Never enter your spouse's Facebook account without permission.

Facebook could be your enemy or your friend

Some Utah residents who were ending marriages have been able to use Facebook to achieve their divorce goals in court, while others have had Facebook used against them. In this regard, Facebook could be your friend or your enemy depending on your situation. Those spouses who use Facebook responsibly and effectively will have a better chance of achieving a fair and equitable result in their divorce proceedings.

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